Education is Going Mobile: Infographic of Mobile Trends in the Classroom. by @MimioTechnology


Hoy traemos a este espacio esta infografía del blog de Mimio titulada Education is Going Mobile: Infographic of Mobile Trends in the Classroom ,que nos presentan así:

Everyone is going mobile, but what does that really mean?

As mobile devices increasingly become a part of our everyday lives, they are slowly but surely becoming a key part of our classrooms. While some schools continue to ban cell phones, others are embracing them – as well as other kinds of mobile devices. This infographic provides up-to-date statistics on the use of mobile devices in education, and the numbers may surprise you. Check out how students, teachers, and even parents are going mobile.a


(leer más...) Fuente: [ Blog MImio]

A day in the life of the modern smartphone user. Mobile Usage Trends. Peak times for content on mobile


Hoy traemos a este espacio la siguiente infografía, creada por Citrix

 Cuales son las actividades preferidas por los usuarios según la hora del día.
El 50% de los datos de redes móviles es utilizado por los reproductores de medios como YouTube.
El 50% de los sitios móviles cargan en 5 segundos o menos, 3 segundos más rápido que en 20134 de cada 10 usuarios lo usan para hacer networking a través de las redes sociales.
1 de cada 10 usuarios utiliza juegos que se conectan a la red.
El 35% de las personas duerme con su dispositivo móvil.
Fuente: [citrix ]

How much does Mobile eLearning cost?

mlearningYou’ve heard all the hype. Mobile learning is the next big thing in the LMS/eLearning space.

But you’re skeptical.  You’re the kind of hard-headed “show-me-the-numbers” type that won’t just rush headlong into the newest online training trend.

You want to be prepared first.  You want to know, “what’s it gonna cost me?”

Well, I’ve spent a lot of time in the learning management system space, and I’ll tell you.

The true cost of mLearning

Obviously, costs will differ depending on your organization and needs, but you can still get a good rough estimate by following some key, basic rules.

Because mobile learning is, essentially, publishing your eLearning courses as a mobile app (either web-based or native) costs for mobile learning will largely mirror costs for developing a general mobile app.  That said, here’s the information you should use to estimate them:

  • Research suggests that to develop just one screen of a mobile application takes about one week with a full time employee (FTE).  This includes planning, development, and then testing and final approval.  Thus, for example, an eight page enterprise mobile app would take eight weeks. Multiply this by the hourly salary of your FTE to come up with a basic estimate of costs.  Note that this will not include any one-off costs like developer licenses for app creation tools.
  • Developer licenses will cost you typically around $100 a year, but if you’re using a course authoring tool to develop the content and publish it to mobile this could be closer to $1,000.
  • A study from Deloitte claims that developing for multiple mobile platforms will increase costs as well. For each additional platform/OS (like Blackberry and Android) you develop a mobile app for, costs go up by 60%.
  • If you decide to go with an external app developer, expect to pay anywhere from $8,000 to $50,000 for a native, database app.  This also means you’ll still be responsible for providing all the course content yourself, so be sure to factor that into the costs as well.
  • Try to account for miscellaneous costs.  If you’re converting existing content to a mobile format, that will add to the cost (even just re-doing graphics like banners to fit better on a mobile screen will have a cost).

So, now you know the potential costs of adding some mobile learning courses to your training content.  But don’t let this discourage you.  Despite the numbers, the potential benefit of mobile learning actually is a big one, especially if you’re the kind of organization that has workers or employees out in the field, as it allows “point of need” training resources and allows employees to learn even when they’re stuck at the airport.

Even if your workforce isn’t remote or always away, mobile learning has been shown to increase retention of training material and it combats that dastardly Forgetting Curve because it can be done anytime, anywhere, and often.

What else?

Did I forget any considerations for mobile learning costs?  Other hidden expenses I didn’t mention?

Author

jp-bio picJ.P. currently works as a Content Editor at Capterra, a privately held technology and online media company focused on bringing together buyers and sellers of business software. He is a graduate of Georgetown University where he founded The Georgetown Federalist. Follow him on Twitter at @rizzleJPizzle.

Applications of online training: product training

When a company has a new product, despite it being an exciting time, there is the issue of training employees on its features which may be problematic due to the time and cost involved, especially in face-to-face training. Employee productivity drops when employees are spending many hours sitting in training rooms during work hours – and when the benefits of that training are not trackable it hardly seems worth the effort. Online training solves all of these problems by being available to the employee in his/ her own free time, and saving the company the costs of bringing in a trainer, renting spaces for training, travel expenses involved and lost productivity.

What’s more, in the case of multinationals, when staff are trained across borders, training programs need to be adapted to different markets since a “one size fits all” approach will not work. With elearning, product training courses can be adapted with a minimum of fuss so that cultural learning differences can be accounted for and content can be delivered consistently across borders.

There is also a very real impact in terms of ROI. Businessspectator.com cites the following example: “In July 2013, CommVault looked to demonstrate the value of training by conducting a test with a customer that had consistently reported high numbers of monthly training-related incidents.” CommVault had the customer do a specific course for one of its products. After completing the training the pre-training incident log of 17.5 calls per month moved to 6.5 calls per month – a decrease of more than 62%. “This delivered a saving of $5,000. Before taking the course, the operating cost for this particular customer was $8,000+ per month, not including the cost impact of customer productivity losses and downtime.”

Benefits of online product training:

  • Training becomes flexible, easy and quick. Staff can complete training in their own time, on their own devices, and on the go.
  • Employees can be trained up on a new product or service in multiple locations, multiple languages, all at once or at different times, and from day one of release!
  • Training can be adapted cross-culturally and to different markets, quickly and easily.
  • Companies will have more efficient and trained staff with up-to-date and applicable knowledge.
  • Greater efficiency and productivity means increased profits.

FREE eBook: eLearning 101 – concepts, trends, applications

ebook-banner-4The team at eFront and TalentLMS have got together to create a FREE elearning eBook to download on everything anyone needed to know about elearning! This eLearning 101’ book covers all important and relevant concepts, trends and applications of elearning.

People new to elearning will appreciate the first chapters which define elearning, describe best practices, goes over the basics on learning platforms, and online courses – how to make elearning effective and the tools that help you to do so.

Those more familiar with the basic concepts will find a wealth of information on current elearning trends which shape and define eLearning now, and in the near and distant future. Topics covered include: social and collaborative learning, blended learning, gamification, micro-learning, video learning, rapid elearning, personalization and elearning, and continuous learning.

Final chapters explore applications of elearning in customer service, sales training, safety training, customer training, IT training, healthcare training and product training.

This eBook will be updated from time to time so if you have any suggestions for chapters you’d like to see please do let us know! And happy reading! :)

DOWNLOAD YOUR FREE EBOOK COPY

Synchronous vs asynchronous elearning

DeliveryFormats_1In today’s elearning environment the type of learning that takes place is generally divided into one of two categories: synchronous and asynchronous. Both strategies have their own pros and cons, and the technique that is right for a student greatly depends upon their method of absorbing the information that is being provided.

What is synchronous learning?

Examples of synchronous elearning are online chat and videoconferencing. Any learning tool that is in real-time, such as instant messaging that allows students and teachers to ask and answer questions immediately, is synchronous. Rather than learning on their own students who participate in synchronous learning courses are able to interact with other students and their teachers during the lesson.

The main benefit of synchronous learning is that it enables students to avoid feelings of isolation since they are in communication with others throughout the learning process. However synchronous learning is not as flexible in terms of time allotment, as students would have to set aside a specific time in order to attend a live teaching session or online course in real-time. So it may not be ideal for those who already have busy schedules.

What is asynchronous learning?

Asynchronous learning on the other hand can be carried out even when the student or teacher is offline. Coursework and communications delivered via email and messages posted on community forums are perfect examples of asynchronous elearning. In these instances, students will typically complete the lessons on their own and merely use the internet as a support tool rather than venturing online solely for interactive classes.

A student is able to follow the curriculum at their own pace, without having to worry about scheduling conflicts. This may be a perfect option for users who enjoy taking their time with each lesson plan in the curriculum and would prefer to research topics on their own. However, those who may lack the motivation to do the coursework on their own may find that they do not receive significant benefit from asynchronous learning tools. Asynchronous learning can also lead to feelings of isolation, as there is no real interactive educational environment.

Ideally, effective elearning courses should include both asynchronous and synchronous learning activities. This allows students and teachers to benefit from the different delivery formats regardless of their schedules or preferred learning methods. This approach provides students with access to immediate help if needed, while still giving them the ability to learn at their own pace.

10 eLearning buzzwords you need to know!

top-10In this post we’ve put together short descriptions of the top 10 buzzwords in eLearning at the moment: Tin Can, Social Learning, Gamification, mLearning, Tablet learning, Rapid eLearning, Microlearning, Personalization, Blended learning, and Lifelong learning.

Tin Can

The Tin Can API is a brand new learning technology specification that opens up an entire world of experiences (online and offline). This API captures the activities that happen as part of learning experiences. A wide range of systems can now securely communicate with a simple vocabulary that captures this stream of activities. Previous specifications were difficult and had limitations whereas the Tin Can API is simple and flexible, and lifts many of the older restrictions. Mobile learning, simulations, virtual worlds, serious games, real-world activities, experiential learning, social learning, offline learning, and collaborative learning are just some of the things that can now be recognized and communicated well with the Tin Can API. What’s more, the Tin Can API is community-driven, and free to implement.  (TinCanAPI.com)

For more on Tin Can check our previous posts listed on this page.

Social Learning

Social learning is learning that takes place through social interaction between peers and it may or may not lead to a change in attitudes and/or behavior. More specifically, to be considered social learning, a process must: (1) demonstrate that a change in understanding has taken place in the individuals involved; (2) demonstrate that this change goes beyond the individual and becomes situated within wider social units or communities of practice; and (3) occur through social interactions and processes between actors within a social network (Reed et al., 2010).

For more on Social Learning check our previous posts on-topic listed on this page.

Gamification

Karl Kapp, author of The Gamification of Learning and Instruction: Game-Based Methods and Strategies for Training and Education, defines it as the use of game-based mechanics, aesthetics and game thinking to engage people, motivate action, promote learning and solve problems. He says it’s much more than just adding ‘rewards, points, and badges’ to processes to motivate people – it’s the instructional method and not just the delivery system that provides the elements for learning in a game situation i.e. we must ask what ‘pieces’ in games makes them engaging such as interactivity, content, story.

Gamification for Learning – Interview with Karl Kapp http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=__Y1m8XF77k

mLearning

Mobile learning has been defined as: any sort of learning that happens when the learner is not at a fixed, predetermined location, or learning that happens when the learner takes advantage of the learning opportunities offered by mobile technologies.(Wikipedia) In other words mobile learning decreases limitation of learning location with the mobility of general portable devices. But mobile learning is more than just using mobile devices to learn – it is also about the mobility of the learner.

For more on mLearning check out our previous posts listed here.

Tablet or T-learning

Tablet leaning by definition is learning on tablet devices. But is eLearning on tablets really mobile learning? Yes.

In defining mobile learning we need to focus more on the activity of learning at a distance using a mobile device and not on the devices themselves. Tablets are mobile devices – but perhaps not as ubiquitously mobile as smartphones. Tablets have more in common with the desktop and laptop than with the mobile phone when it comes to screen size, yet the touchscreen capabilities of both the tablet and the phone mean that learning design needs to take into account these differences in delivery.

For more on T-learning check this list of related blog posts!
We also love this great post in Mashable – 6 Reasons Tablets Are Ready for the Classroom.
For different opinions on whether eLearning on tablets is mLearning read:
Is eLearning on Tablets Really mLearning’ and ‘Is eLearning on Tablets Really mLearning [Chime In]’ by RJ Jacquez.

Rapid elearning

Rapid elearning is, essentially, a faster process of designing and developing online-based learning courses. Rather than spending months or years developing a course, rapid elearning allows course creators to build lessons and content in a matter of days or weeks. This is typically done through PowerPoint or narrated videos which are designed to dispense information quickly and conveniently to the students. Software is then utilized to test the students, as well as to provide them with activities that they can perform on their own in between pre-recorded presentations or videos.

Microlearning

Microlearning provides the knowledge and skill sets that online education typically offers without overwhelming the learner. It involves learning in smaller steps, and goes hand-in-hand with traditional elearning. Activities that are micro-learning based usually feature short term lessons, projects or coursework that is designed to provide the student with bits of information. For example, rather than trying to teach a student about a broad subject at once, aspects of the topic will be broken down into smaller, more digestible chunks.

Typically, microlearning exercises are best utilized at the point where a student will actually need the information, or when they are going to be most receptive to receiving that information.

Personalization

Personalized elearning enables learners to customize a variety of the elements involved in the online education process. This means that they are asked to set their own goals, go at their own pace, and communicate with instructors and learners to personalize the learning process. Ideally, the learner is placed in charge of managing his/her own learning, and is able to customize the experience by having a direct say in the processes and content that is being provided.

The key elements that are customized in personalized elearning are: the timing and pace of learning, and the instructional approach (including lessons and activities that draw upon the learner’s experiences and interests). In other words, truly personalized elearning means students are given the chance to learn what they want when they want, and even how they will learn the material.

Blended Learning

Blended learning is a formal education program in which a student learns at least in part through online delivery of content and instruction with some element of student control over time, place, path, and/or pace. While still attending a “brick-and-mortar” school structure, face-to-face classroom methods are combined with computer-mediated activities. Proponents of blending learning cite the opportunity for data collection and customization of instruction and assessment as two major benefits of this approach. (Wikipedia)

Read: The Definition Of Blended Learning

Lifelong learning

Lifelong learning is the “ongoing, voluntary, and self-motivated”[1] pursuit of knowledge for either personal or professional reasons. Therefore, it not only enhances social inclusion, active citizenship and personal development, but also competitiveness and employability.[2]

The term recognizes that learning is not confined to childhood or the classroom but takes place throughout life and in a range of situations. During the last fifty years, constant scientific and technological innovation and change has had a profound effect on learning needs and styles. Learning can no longer be divided into a place and time to acquire knowledge (school) and a place and time to apply the knowledge acquired (the workplace).[3] Instead, learning can be seen as something that takes place on an on-going basis from our daily interactions with others and with the world around us. (Wikipedia)

(1.) Department of Education and Science (2000). Learning for Life: White Paper on Adult Education. Dublin: Stationery Office. (2.) Commission of the European Communities: “Adult learning: It is never too late to learn“. COM(2006) 614 final. Brussels, 23.10.2006. (3.) Fischer, Gerhard (2000). “Lifelong Learning – More than Training” in Journal of Interactive Learning Research, Volume 11 issue 3/4 pp 265-294.

Designing learning for millennials

millennials“Millennials” is the corporate training buzzword we’ve been hearing a lot lately. According to PwC, by 2016, 80 percent of the workforce will be made up of millennials – the generation of people born between 1981 and 1999. As with any major culture shift, some companies are a little nervous, and understandably so – trainers know it could be significant but aren’t quite sure what to do about it.

What are some characteristics of workplace Millennials? Millennials rely more on email and social platforms rather than the phone and face-to-face communications to get work done. They also often like to use multiple mediums, for example switching between text, email or phone for a single topic as well.1 They are incredibly comfortable with technology, but let’s not forget that many industries employ older generations that have become just as comfortable with it. In fact, millennials are not unlike other audiences that training professionals have strived to engage.

So, how are millennial learners different?

According to a Pew Research study, they are motivated self-learners that can be self-directed employees. “Millennials seek transparency and real time feedback in their work environment. They have been accustomed to using innovative technologies for learning in their studies from K-12 to University education. It is a natural progression for them to use similar technologies for training in their work environments.”2

Investing in training that meets the requirements necessary to engage millennials does not necessarily exclude current and future generations and can easily meet their needs.

Delivering content to millennials

Allen communication recommends three strategies that can be tremendously successful when used to deliver content to a millennial audience:

  •        Mobile learning
  •        Gamification
  •        Video Based Learning

Mobile learning

With the millennial’s preference for multiple platforms they can be reached via desktop, laptop, tablet and mobile – with mobile driving much of their communication.

Learning initiatives for mobile need to build on current mobile habits to maximize the efficacy of training (rather than asking users to change their habits).3  So, for example, users would normally use mobile devices for quick information, simple interaction, and one-click answers to problems and instructional designs needs to incorporate that.

Gamification

Karl Kapp, author of The Gamification of Learning and Instruction: Game-Based Methods and Strategies for Training and Education, defines gamification as the use of game-based mechanics, aesthetics and game thinking to engage people, motivate action, promote learning and solve problems. Gamification takes elements of gaming and adds them to traditional instruction with interactivity and engagement as first consideration.

Like other training strategies, learning games must directly align with business goals in order to be a valuable – for example building desired skills in managers through realistic scenarios.

Video-based Learning

Millennials have grown up in a social, video culture in which media becomes a conversation and not a passive review.

There are endless ways to exploit video in order to create motivating and engaging learning experiences. Learners can be engaged as viewers or content creators. Teaching methods must turn it into a springboard for engagement.

Conclusion

Every generation in the workplace will gain from innovation in instructional strategies and tools that cater to millennial’s needs for new corporate training methods.
The ultimate cross-generational goal is training that will help employees adapt to the work environment and reach business goals effectively.

References:

  1. How Millennials Can Become Better Managers http://blog.clomedia.com/2013/07/how-millennials-can-become-better-managers/
  2. Millennial Whitepaper http://www.allencomm.com/3-strategies-to-engage-millennials-get-results/millennial-whitepaper/
  3. The Millennials Are Coming! Proven Engagement Strategies http://www.learningsolutionsmag.com/articles/1188/