How Not to Cite an Image

This morning one of my Facebook friends posted one of those "ten signs you're from..." Buzzfeed-like articles that sucked me in. As I looked through the article I noticed something strange about the image credits. In fact, they really were not image credits at all. The caption below the images simply reads, "Source: Google Images." Besides not naming the owner of the image, the author of the article didn't link to the source nor indicated that it was used by permission. I took a screenshot and added a comment to it. You can see my screenshot below. 
Click the screenshot to view it in full screen.

(Yes, you can use this screenshot if you want to share it with your students). 

Applications for Education
Between great public domain image sources like Pixabay (click here for other options) and Creative Commons image search tools there are few occasions when students should have to resort to claiming fair use to use a copyrighted image. If they do end up at that step, they should at least give proper credit to the owner of the image.

Google Improves Image Search Tools Menu

Thanks to a Tweet from Matt Cutts, the head of the webspam team at Google, I learned that the tool bar in Google Images now includes "usage rights." Now instead of having to open the advanced search menu you can just click the "search tools" menu and select "usage rights" without leaving the search results page. Screenshots of the two steps are included below.

Step 1:
click image for full size

Step 2:
click image for full size

Video – Three Ways Students Can Search for Creative Commons Licensed Images

Whenever students start searching on the web for pictures to use in their slideshows, videos, or infographics I have them search first for public domain and Creative Commons licensed images. Using public domain images and Creative Commons licensed images (with proper attribution) ensures that students don't accidentally infringe on someone's copyright rights. In the video below I demonstrate three ways for students to search for Creative Commons licensed images.

The CC Attribution Helper mentioned in the video can be found here.

Using Google Image Search to Solve a Flea Market Mystery

Image credit: Becky White.
This afternoon my friend Becky White posted on Facebook some pictures of the tea set that she found at a flea market. She was curious about the meaning of the lettering on the bottom of the cups. My suggestion was to take a close-up picture of the lettering and upload it to Google Image search to try to find some matches that could lead to an answer to her question. I tried it myself by using a screenshot of Becky's picture and it didn't get me too far (I couldn't zoom-in enough on the lettering) until I combined the use of the image with some text in the search field. Then I was able to find that the lettering meant "long life."

Watch the short video below to learn how to combine image upload with text to improve your Google Images search results.

Use Text and Images for Better Google Image Search Results

When most people look for images through Google Images they just type their queries. You can also upload an image to search for other images that are similar to it. A little tip that I just discovered by browsing through some of Daniel Russell's videos is to combine the two methods. In other words you can upload an image and use text to refine your image search. Watch the short video below to see how it works.